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Tom Hanks Got 'Screwed' During 'Secret' Vacation With The Obamas




Oprah may have kept mum about her soirée with the Obamas on a yacht across French Polynesia, but Tom Hanks is not so disciplined.


The 60-year-old actor admitted to Stephen Colbert on Friday’s episode of “The Late Show” that he felt “very low on the food chain” while in the presence of his elite travel buddies: former President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama, Bruce Springsteen and Oprah. But that didn’t stop him from enjoying his time with these fellow national treasures.


“Every day is just like crazy ‘Love Boat’ scandals, resort, fantastic,” Hanks said.


However, the actor added, much of what the group discussed during the tropical trip was classified.


“Both Oprah and I were really pissed off because, is this where we are in the world?” Hanks asked Colbert. “Is this what’s going on with social media that Oprah and I cannot go on a billionaire’s boat to Tahiti with a former president of the United States and not keep it secret for God’s sake?”


The actor did divulge at least one story from his high-profile getaway, in which he said he got “screwed.”


“I’ll tell you one thing that happened to Tom Hanks, little Tommy Hanks, on that trip,” he said. “He gets screwed ... in the bad way, in the pejorative way, not in the delightful way.”


Watch the video above to find out what happened during the Obamas’ exclusive yacht trip to make Hanks swear off that type of vacation altogether. His story starts at 6:12.

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22 'Fyre' Tweets About The Disaster That Was The Fyre Festival






This Ja Rules.


Fyre Festival, a luxury music festival organized by Ja Rule on a private island in the Bahamas, ended up being a straight-up disaster when concertgoers arrived on Thursday.


Blink 182, one of the bands scheduled to headline, pulled out at the last minute. Accommodations were a mess, as well. Tents were half-built; there were feral dogs running amuck; and the promised gourmet grub was actually sad-looking cheese sandwiches, based on numerous social media reports.


Naturally, attendees were angry, being that they paid $5,000 to $250,000 for tickets, according to Rolling Stone.


And let’s just say that the news of a bunch of rich kids not attending the super-luxe party they thought they were going to inspired quite a few jokes on Twitter.


Here’s the most “fyre” ones:


 

























































































-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

50 Of The Best Indie Bookstores In America


“Indie Bookstores are Back,” The New York Times proclaimed early last year. “People Are Still Buying Books At Indie Bookstores,” Forbes announced a few months later, somewhat incredulously. A quick piece from The New York Post on the “indie-bookstore boomlet” this month seems to seal the deal: independent bookshops are definitely not dying. 


Those who tolled the death knell too early are probably just as happy as everyone else. No one wants to see a neighborhood bookshop suffer. Who can resist the pungent smell of old novels, the shadowy intimacy of packed aisles, or the incredibly satisfying feel of a heavy tote bag filled with staff picks? If anything, we’re buying more books than we can actually read, which is hardly a problem for the brick-and-mortar booksellers still threatened by behemoths like Amazon.


If the mere mention of book odor makes you want to sprint into the shop around the corner, your timing couldn’t be better. April 29 is Independent Bookstore Day, and in honor of the occasion, we asked people across the HuffPost newsroom to nominate a few stores they’ve grown to love over the years. After days of waxing poetic, we came up with a mega-list of incredible indie bookstores that are alive, well and deserving of your patronage on this most holy of literary holidays. 


Behold, 50 of the best indie bookstores in America:


1. John K. King Used & Rare Books (Detroit, Michigan)



”One of the most unique bookstores in the Midwest, John K. King is one of the hidden jewels of Detroit. The shelves are filled with books you can’t find anywhere else. The bookstore holds around 1 million books in stock.” ― Philip Lewis, Front Page Editor


Check out John K. King here.


2. Taylor Books (Charleston, West Virginia)



“Taylor Books is a beloved spot on a quaint street in West Virginia’s capital city that offers a good read, beautiful art, a solid cup of coffee and a quiet place to enjoy it all. Taylor doesn’t just have a great selection of books ― the store hosts live musicians, holds book signings with notable authors and even serves as a place for creative types, like creative writing and improv groups, to meet. I love that they make sure to feature authors, artists and publications based in and around West Virginia and work to promote other arts-related businesses in the community.” ― Paige Lavender, Senior Politics Editor


Check out Taylor Books here.


3. Literati (Ann Arbor, Michigan)



”A great bookstore for a great college town, Literati sits right in the middle of Ann Arbor’s downtown shopping district. It’s the perfect place to spend an hour ― or two or three ― browsing the staff recommendations, which are reliably excellent.” ― Jonathan Cohn, Senior National Correspondent


Check out Literati here.


4. The Strand (New York, New York)



“I worked at The Strand when I first moved to New York City and it truly embodies so much about what makes this global city so amazing. Not only have numerous influential creatives worked here at some point in their careers, but the space itself is a defining part of the history of New York City. The last remaining staple of the historic ‘Book Row’ ― a massive area of 48 different bookstores dating back to the late 1800s ― The Strand is now the second-biggest used bookstore in the entire country. Go get lost in the literal miles of books while you discover some of the rich history of the store itself.” ― James Michael Nichols, Deputy Queer Voices Editor


Check out the Strand here.


5. Left Bank Books (St. Louis, Missouri)



”When I was going to college in St. Louis, Left Bank Books was a short bike ride from my apartment. The shop has incredible new and used book selections, ingeniously themed reading groups, impressive author events, and just a generally inclusive vibe that makes it seem like a neighborhood spot for anyone and everyone.” ― Katherine Brooks, Senior Arts & Culture Editor


Check out Left Bank Books here.


6. Old Tampa Book Company (Tampa, Florida)



“Old Tampa Book Company is this little store in downtown that usually gets overlooked, but the second you step in it’s the best place you’ve ever been. All the shelves are filled to the brim and you can find so many out-of-print or unique editions of books. And the entire place just smells like books ― overwhelmingly so.” ― Doha Madani, Associate Trends Reporter


Check out Old Tampa Book Company here.


7. Women & Children First Bookstore (Chicago, Illinois)



”Women & Children First is the kind of indie bookstore that belies an easy, convenient characterization. Sure, it’s a feminist bookstore with a name eerily similar to a certain Portlandia sketch. But it’s not some caricature. This place has a real heart and cares about their neighborhood and city, hosting regular community events spotlighting both emerging local and established international names. And their handwritten book recommendations throughout the store have never led me astray. It’s the real deal.” ― Joseph Erbentraut, Senior Reporter


Check out Women & Children First here.


8. Dickson Street Bookshop (Fayetteville, Arkansas)



“Dickson Street Bookshop is located just a short, lovely walk from the University of Arkansas campus in Fayetteville, so it’s a huge draw for college students and bibliophiles alike. Its towering, overstocked bookshelves wind in and out of rooms, almost as if they go on for miles. As an undergraduate, I needed a copy of Arthur Miller’s ‘Death Of A Salesman’ for a theater class I was taking that semester, and the shop owner knew exactly which room, which shelf and which precise stack of books was home to the one I needed, leading me right to it. I still have the tattered, out-of-print copy to this day.” ― Brittany Nims, RYOT Studio Editor


Check out Dickson Street Bookshop here.


9. Powell’s Books (Portland, Oregon)



“If there’s a list of great wonders of the literary world, Powell’s sits at the top. They call it ‘Powell City of Books’ for a reason ― it occupies a full city block and supposedly contains more than a million volumes.” ― Jonathan Cohn


Check out Powell’s here. 


10. Farley’s Bookshop (New Hope, Pennsylvania)



”Farley’s is nestled on the Delaware River in the historic and queer enclave of New Hope, Pennsylvania. There’s always an angelic cat that greets you (and every good independent bookstore should have that). It feels like a quintessential Americana place that could’ve easily been in a scene in ‘Hocus Pocus’ or something.” ― Melissa Radzimski, Social Media Editor


Check out Farley’s here.


11. The Book Barn (Niantic, Connecticut) 



“I never miss a chance to visit the Book Barn when I’m up in Connecticut. I could spend hours perusing the shop’s collection, which is actually spread out over four small locations in the coastal town of Niantic, which is worthy of exploring in its own right. Every visit is an adventure!” ― Curtis Wong, Senior Queer Voices Editor


Check out the Book Barn here.


12. The Last Bookstore (Los Angeles, California)



”Part bookstore, part art collective and sculpture, this shop has a solid selection of indie new stuff plus an extensive user collection that is worth checking out. A beautiful place.” ― Robb Monn, Head of Engineering


Check out the Last Bookstore.


13. Prairie Lights (Iowa City, Iowa)



”It’s everything you could want in a bookstore. A staff that knows their stuff? Check. A kids section that feels like a secret hideaway? Check. Coffee, cookies, and booze upstairs? Check. A secondhand books section so you can splurge? CHECK.” ― Chloe Angyal, Senior Front Page Editor


Check out Prairie Lights here.


14. The Children’s Bookstore (Baltimore, Maryland)



“This little bookstore is tucked away on a side street in the Roland Park neighborhood of Baltimore, and it’s so great. The staff is super knowledgeable, and they have a great selection of books for all different ages. Back when Harry Potter books were still coming out, The Children’s Bookstore would host a huge celebration leading up to the midnight release. They’d close off the street and have tons of activities for all of the dressed-up wizards and witches. You could get your book there at midnight, or they had a delivery service that would drop books off to the houses in the neighborhood (starting at midnight). It’s a great bookstore and community.” ― Hollis Miller, Associate Voices Social Editor


Check out the Children’s Bookstore here.


15. Elliott Bay Book Company (Seattle, Washington)



”I love reading staff recommendations, and this enormous bookstore had way more than I could skim in one visit. There’s a comfy coffee shop inside, so it’s the perfect zen stop, whether you’re working in the city or visiting from out of town. Grab a book, relax and people-watch.” ― Katherine Brooks


Check out Elliott Bay here.


16. Books Galore (Erie, Pennsylvania) 



“Independently owned and operated, I’ve frequented the place since I was a kid and continued to do so until I moved to Louisiana last year. When I was a kid, I liked going there every week to get my favorite comics. As I got older, they were a great resource for old books ― especially rare and hard-to-find books. They are great people and always friendly. They also do a lot of things for kids in the community, such as hosting games, having folks dress up as superheroes and hosting a free comic book day.” ― David Lohr, Senior Crime Reporter


Check out Books Galore here.


17. J. Michaels Books (Eugene, Oregon)



“A cozy and colorful fixture of one of Americas most colorful small cities. The owner is usually behind the counter, obscured by his curated selection of new releases. His arrangements never fail to compel even this most casual of bookworms to purchase. On your way out, take a peek at first editions and antique copies of many of Americas greatest writers. My wife and I once drove a Penguin Books–branded Mini Cooper across America, visiting indie bookshops all along the way. There is none quite like J Michaels.” ― Isaac Schmidt, Software Engineer


Check out J. Michaels here.


18. Westsider Rare & Used Books Inc. (New York, New York) 



“If there were a car air freshener called ‘Used Bookstore’ they would go to Westsider Rare & Used Books Inc.” ― Marc Janks, Multimedia Platforms Manager


Check out Westsider Rare & Used Books here.


19. The Iliad Bookshop (North Hollywood, California)



”Iliad Bookshop is a place you can get lost in ― and if you’re a book lover like me, you might suddenly discover that hours have elapsed while you were blissfully exploring that rabbit hole. They specialize in literature and the arts and have an impressive collection of rare books, in particular. If you somehow tire of the endless maze of books, you can take a break to play with the shop cats (yes, literal cats, not just cool people) or chat with the very friendly staff.” ― Antonia Blumberg, Religion Reporter


Check out the Iliad here.


20. The Montague Bookmill (Montague, Massachusetts)



“You know those bookstores where you can spend a whole afternoon? The Bookmill is like that, but more like days, or weeks ― I’d rent a room there if I could. The 1800s gristmill is home to thousands of used books, thoughtfully organized and sprawled out in room after room designed for wandering and hiding out among the shelves. If you somehow get bored of book buying, you can take a picturesque stroll by the Sawmill River or bring your finds to the Lady Killigrew Cafe, order a local beer and start reading.” ― Kate Abbey-Lambertz, National Reporter


Check out the Montague here.


21. Green Apple Books (San Francisco, California)



“Green Apple is the kind of bookstore that reminds you what an otherworldly escape reading is and makes you wonder why you spend so much time watching Netflix. It’s sizable but divided up into smaller rooms and alcoves you’ll want to hole up in for hours. It was named Publisher’s Weekly bookstore of the year in 2014, but it’s remained a humble neighborhood spot exactly as I remember it as a little kid growing up around the corner.” ― Lydia O’Connor, Reporter


Check out Green Apple here.


22. Maxwell’s House of Books (La Mesa, California)



“Maxwell’s has a lot of rare academic and scholarly titles as well as other hard-to-find titles. The owners are happy to engage in deep conversations about the books. It’s in a cozy neighborhood in a San Diego suburb and I feel like everyone is stopping by to say, ‘Hi.’” ― David Moye, Reporter


Check out Maxwell’s here.


23. Chamblin Book Mine (Jacksonville, Florida)



“I used to get lost in this place when I was a nerdy high school kid in Jacksonville. The aisles go on forever, and it’s basically impossible to leave empty-handed. It’s a great place to sell your old books, too. Highly recommended.” ― Kate Palmer, Lifestyle Editorial Director


Check out Chamblin Book Mine here.


24. Book Culture (New York, New York)



“This is everything a modern bookstore should be. It has something for everyone. Best Part: They have mystery books wrapped up so you can have a blind date with a book.” ― Marc Janks


Check out Book Culture here.


25. Books and Books (Coral Gables, Florida)



“Every author who’s done a tour knows about Books and Books, because it’s practically a South Florida institution. Worth visiting for the architecture alone, but it’s the reading that will keep you coming back.” ― Jonathan Cohn


Check out Books and Books here.


26. William Caxton Ltd Books (Ellison Bay, Wisconsin)



”This is one of the finest book stores I’ve ever been to, made even more incredible due to its location, completely off the beaten path on the Wisconsin peninsula. The owner is a retired professor and collector of rare books. This is a place you go to find books you’ve never seen before.” ― Andy McDonald, Comedy Editor


Check out William Caxton Ltd here.


27. Relay Bookhouse (Bethel, Connecticut) 



“It literally has tunnels of books from floor to ceiling — it’s like a maze. Books are piled up on the floor, you can hit dead ends and you can spend hours in it. I didn’t know bookstores like this still existed. Whenever I’m in the area I always stop in and walk around for a bit.” ― Samantha Tomaszewski, Associate Social Media Editor


Check out Relay here.


28. Inquiring Minds Bookstore (Saugerties, New York)



“In upstate New York, nestled in the quaint town of Saugerties, lies Inquiring Minds Bookstore. During a recent weekend stay in the area, I stumbled upon this cozy independent shop, filled to the brim with both new and used books. There’s a coffee shop inside, and you can get lost wandering around and browsing the journals, CDs and toys, which are also for sale. Inquiring Minds has a sister shop in New Paltz, New York.” ― Lauren Moraski, Entertainment Editorial Director


Check out Inquiring Minds here.


29. Skylight Books + Art Annex (Los Angeles, California)



”The most solid new bookstore for fiction and art books. Great staff picks and great staff. I’ve found many gems here that I’d never have known existed.” ― Rob Monn, Head of Engineering 


Check out Skylight here.


30. McNally Jackson (New York, New York)



“This is my favorite bookstore in the city ― it’s really well-organized and I love all of the recommendations from the staff. They also have a great magazine section, and they even have a little cafe where you can grab a coffee and read your newest purchase.” ― Hollis Miller, Voices Associate Social Media Editor


Check out McNally Jackson here.


31. Book Revue (Huntington, New York) 



“Growing up on Long Island surrounded by lacrosse bros and meatheads, Book Revue served as an oasis of art and literature. Big-name authors came to town for talks there. The 17,500-square-foot space is flanked by book shelves in nearly every possible space, a café with Korean candies and decent loose-leaf tea and a used book section where I bought my first W.H. Auden book for just $1. It’s always amazed me that, even as the record stores and other shops I loved folded, this place remained open. Thank God for that.” ― Alexander Kaufman, Business & Environment Reporter


“I usually force whichever family member I’m visiting on Long Island to make a stop at Book Revue, located in the picturesque, walkable downtown of Huntington. The store is expansive enough to easily kill an hour or two browsing, and they have a nice selection of inexpensive literary remainders — useful for anyone wishing to build up their classics library. With ample readings and events, they’re a good resource for the bookish who don’t want to travel all the way into Manhattan.” ― Jillian Capewell, Entertainment News Editor


Check out Book Revue here.


32. Little City Books (Hoboken, New Jersey)



”It’s a super-friendly atmosphere with welcoming staff, and carries a diverse range of novels and nonfiction. It’s also has a vast children’s section. It frequently holds readings and Q&As with authors and hosts a variety of book clubs focussing on different genres and writers.” ― Will Tooke, Producer


Check out Little City here.



33. Main Street Books (Saint Helena, California)





“Tucked between pricey boutiques and wine shops, this tiny gem of a bookstore was a saving grace for me growing up in a small Napa Valley town when I was too young to enjoy the tasting rooms and vineyard tours the region is famous for. I’d spend hours in this little shop (roughly the size of a small bedroom), picking up dozens of used novels (better for my babysitting-fund budget) while always eyeing the new titles with envy. I still make a point of dropping in when I’m home for a visit, particularly to check out the latest additions to the well-curated cooking section or ask for a recommendation. And if they don’t have a book in the shop, the owner will happily order it for you. I’ll forever be grateful for when she pre-ordered Harry Potter and the Order of Phoenix for me and let me pick it up before the store opened for the day.” ― Mollie Reilly, Deputy Politics Editor


Check out Main Street here.


34. Prospero’s Bookstore (Kansas City, Missouri)





“As a high school kid in Overland Park, Kansas, Prospero’s was an oasis. Its basement smells like centuries-old book pulp ― it’s where I found one of the strangest used Cold War history books I’ve ever read and will never get rid of. On the main floor, you can find more precariously stacked books, plus work from students at the Kansas City Art Institute, or see performances from local musicians and poets. It’s much more than a bookstore, as it should be.” ― Katherine Brooks


Check out Prospero’s here.


35. Book Beat (Oak Park, Michigan)





“A short drive outside of Detroit, Book Beat was one of my favorite destinations as a kid. From the inconspicuous storefront ― they’re located in an outdated suburban strip mall ― you’d never guess that inside it’s warm and lively, with thousands of books are crammed into every inch of available space, stacked up to the ceiling. Friendly staff members are always happy to help you locate a title in the piles, or recommend a book you didn’t know you wanted. They carry a wide range of subjects, but their children’s book collection is truly unbeatable.” ― Kate Abbey-Lambertz


Check out Book Beat here.



36. Karma (Amagansett, New York)



”Karma (with locations in NYC and Amagansett) is both a gallery and a bookseller. They boast a beautiful collection of contemporary art books, many of which they publish themselves.” ― Willa Frej, Reporter


Check out Karma here.


37. Faulkner House Books (New Orleans, Louisiana)



”This teeny, tiny bookstore is housed in a building that was constructed in 1840. William Faulkner lived there in the early 20th century — hence the name — and wrote his first novel Soldiers Play. The space is as charming and mythic as any bookstore lover would hope, with low-slung chandeliers and books lining the walls, ‘Beauty and the Beast’-style. It has a great selection of New Orleans-centric books, from history to cookbooks, for people from out of town.” ― Priscilla Frank, Arts & Culture Writer


Check out Faulkner House here. 


38. Book Thug Nation (Brooklyn, New York)



“So intimate, so cozy and so friendly. I don’t know how they get by selling books for $2.50, but I try to always check out their selection first before I go anywhere else. And Book Thug gets new books every day, so there’s always something to discover.” ― Allison Fox, Lifestyle Trends Editor


Check out Book Thug Nation here.


39. Linden Tree Children’s Books (Los Altos, California)



”You won’t find the children’s books tucked away in a corner here. It’s the entire store. Linden Tree has a friendly and helpful staff, great selection and plenty of in-store events.” ― Ed Mazza, Reporter


Check out Linden Tree here.


40. Half Price Books (Dallas, Texas)



”Half Price Books might be a chain, but it’s family-owned, and, more importantly to some readers, it lives up to its name. Like any used bookstore, visiting comes with the wonder of discovery, a sensation absent from, say, shopping on Amazon. But the flagship store in Dallas is essentially a vast warehouse of books, and getting lost in its aisles is half the fun.” ― Maddie Crum, Books & Culture Writer


Check out Half Price Books here.


41. Haslam’s Book Store Inc (St. Petersburg, Florida)



“Finding refuge in stacks of books from the humidity of Florida and losing track of time was a common occurrence for me at Haslam’s, a massive new and used bookstore established in 1933. I’d take short vacations to St. Petersburg while studying in university to visit friends and wander through the expansive bookshelves, read excerpts on the back of book covers and then flip through pages upon pages of poetry, fiction, memoirs and essays. The science collection in Haslam’s is astounding, and this bookstore helped nurture my love of science out of the classroom. It has an unassuming facade but, as with most good bookstores, once you step inside you are transported into another place and time, lost in your own thoughts, to a place just waiting to be explored.” ― Madeline Wahl, Associate Editor


Check out Haslam’s here.


42. Book Woman (Austin, Texas) 



“In its annual collection of book review and book reviewer data, VIDA has shown that gender parity still hasn’t been achieved when it comes to literature. Women are less likely to get reviewed in several major outlets than men, and they’re less likely to win awards, too. Which is why the concept of the simply named BookWoman is so great. The store showcases women writers, and particularly women writers working in Austin — and it hosts intersectional reading events, too.” ― Maddie Crum


Check out Book Woman here.


43. Off the Beaten Path (Steamboat, Colorado)



”I’ve approached the staff at Off the Beaten Path with as little info as: ‘I’m looking for a really good book. Like, really, really good.’ And I always walk out with something I can’t put down and that I insist pretty much every friend and family member read. The people who work here are incredibly knowledgeable and passionate about books and will keep pulling titles until they find something you’re excited to sit down with. They support local authors, and the ‘staff picks’ are the best way to find out about little-known writers and remember why you should go back and read the classics from high school. And the coffee ... OMG, amazing.” ― Eleanor Goldberg, Impact Editor


Check out Off the Beaten Path here.


44. Housing Works Bookstore Cafe (New York, New York)



“Housing Works, a smallish yet well-stocked two-story shop in Manhattan, is more than a bookstore. The organization takes seriously its role as an advocacy group for people with HIV/AIDS, and raises funds through events to that end. This alone makes it a worthwhile place to buy books, but the spot itself is charming, too, with winding stairways and high ceilings and timely author readings.” ― Maddie Crum


Check out Housing Works here.


45. Stone Soup Books (Camden, Maine)



“Stone Soup is a tiny used bookstore that sits at the top of a creaking staircase in an almost comically narrow building in Camden, Maine’s downtown area. Inside, it feels like the kind of place where the protagonist of a children’s movie would find a long-lost book that unlocked a portal to some sort of fairy tale world. It’s packed with books, most of them well-loved, extremely affordable paperbacks, lining every available inch of wall space and occupying numerous other shelves and piles throughout the store. Every time I’ve been there, one of the owners has been there behind the desk reading, and is exactly the kind of of older gentleman you’d hope to presiding over a charming secondhand bookstore.” ― Hilary Hanson, Reporter


Check out Stone Soup here.


46. Parnassus Books (Nashville, Tennessee)



“I stopped into Parnassus Books during a trip to Nashville a few years ago, and, like many of the city’s other small businesses I visited with friends, it felt like a place that really serves the local readers, both in terms of book recommendations and community space. Fun fact: The store is co-owned by author Ann Patchett.” ― Katherine Brooks


Check out Parnassus here.


47. Source Booksellers (Detroit, Michigan)



“Source Booksellers opened just a few years ago, but it’s thriving, with tons of readings and events ― probably because owner Janet Jones has been collecting and selling books since 1989. Her compact but extensively curated selection of nonfiction books ― with great titles on local subjects, history, culture, art and spirituality, are chosen with an eye toward educating people and enhancing their lives.” ― Kate Abbey-Lambertz


Check out Source Booksellers here.


48. 2nd Edition Books (Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina) 



“An independent bookstore in an airport? Yup. You’ll find 2nd Edition in the terminal at Raleigh-Durham International, past security near the gates. They sell only previously used books, but they have a wide selection (and many are barely used). They’ll even ship to your destination if you want.” ― Jonathon Cohn


Check out 2nd Edition here.


49. Books on the Square (Providence, Rhode Island)



"As a college student in Providence, I had the opportunity to explore some great local spots, and Books on the Square was a true highlight. Located in Wayland Square, it’s welcoming neighborhood shop with a cozy atmosphere and loyal customer base. The staff is very friendly and they often host events and speakers." -- Caroline Bologna, Parents Editor


Check out Books on the Square here. 


50. Politics & Prose (Washington, D.C.)



”No roundup of indie bookstores would be complete without mentioning Politics & Prose, the D.C. institution that, beyond selling books, hosts open mics, nerdy trivia, teach-ins and conversations with politicians, authors, filmmakers and more. When I first visited D.C., I knew enough to add this shop to my itinerary, squeezing it in between tourist spots. And it was worth it.” ― Katherine Brooks


Check out Politics & Prose here.


There are many other indie bookstores that we didn’t write about, but are excellent destinations you should probably check out. Including...



  • Myopic Books in Chicago, Illinois

  • Square Books in Oxford, Mississippi

  • Tattered Cover Bookstore in Denver, Colorado

  • Bluestockings in New York, New York

  • City Lights Book in San Francisco, California


Share this post, tag us on Facebook, and we’ll add more indie bookstores to the bonus list!

-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

How Changing Your Definition Of Success Makes You Successful


One year ago, I made myself a promise: I would no longer postpone my dream to travel the world full-time. It had to be done. A few months later, I had quit my full-time corporate marketing job, left behind my life in New York City, and departed with a one-way ticket to Europe.


Fast-forward to today, and I find myself writing this article after completing a 9-month social experiment around the world, in which I traveled to 17 countries across four continents and stayed with strangers who were personally connected to me somehow. In the process, I ended up finding myself (as one tends to do whilst traveling), building up a significant social media following, and becoming a digital nomad.


If I had stuck to the definition of success by the standards set by the Western world I was raised in, I’d still be in a Manhattan cubicle, head buried under a pile of work, occasionally resurfacing to check Facebook until I could escape and have a few hours of spare time to pursue my real interests. But I’d be getting a nice, fat paycheck, be well up the corporate ladder, with the hopes of someday saving enough for a mortgage.


Instead, I am nomadic and I pursue my interests every day for hours on end. I work whenever I please, and from whatever location that I’ve chosen. The downside being that I’m not raking in the big bucks, there is no corporate ladder for me to climb, and I have zero job security.


Even so... I consider myself not only successful, but the happiest I’ve been. This is what I’ve learned about carving out our own path to success:




Define What Success Means To You


My secret to success is: I define it. If we set our own standards for success, and follow them, then we are successful. It’s that plain and simple.


We spend a lot of time observing the success of others, seeking inspiration into how we can achieve our own. Someone has a successful startup, so perhaps we should start our own. Another person is living the life by making a lot of money, so maybe if we earn more, we can do it too. A co-worker is racing through promotions, so we should push ourselves harder than is sustainable to get promoted as soon as possible.


It’s a never-ending race, and one that won’t get us anywhere if we are blindly competing without purpose. The grass is always greener on the other side, and when we fall into this pattern, we risk believing that we will find fulfillment walking someone else’s path.


Other people’s success should not be a measurement of our own. What makes someone successful or happy is not necessarily aligned with what we do best. We have to live up to our own individual potential, and to do that, we need to properly define what that means for us.


I challenge you to think about what you really want. If your definition of success is gaining recognition from your peers, then you won’t be satisfied until you get that promotion, are featured in the media, win an award, etc. If you think success is money, then you need to seek out a high-paying job or start your own profitable business. If success to you means social contribution, then that may mean working for a non-profit.


My definition of success is having the freedom to pursue my passions (travel and writing), and inspiring people to do the same along the way. If I am traveling freely, making enough money to comfortably get by, and inspiring even one person along the way, then I am succeeding by my standards.


Recognize That Success Is A Process


When I tell people about my project to circumnavigate the globe by couch-surfing through my social network, the initial assumption is that 1. I have a lot of money, 2. I’m crazy, or 3. Both.


What people don’t see is that this has been a process many years in the making. A series of events led me to travel full-time. In the long term, I’ve always wanted to do something like this, and have been passively saving for many years. In the short-term, certain circumstances lined up to push me off the edge: a stint volunteering in Cambodia caused me to re-organize my priorities, my rent unexpectedly went up, I came out of a relationship, and I became increasingly more unsatisfied with my job.


My decision to become a digital nomad wasn’t one big leap – it was a series of steps that eventually led me to this point.


When we look at the success of our peers, we only see the end result. What we don’t see is how hard people worked for it and how long it took. Success is a process, and it should be respected as such. If one year ago, someone told me I would be traveling full-time and working on the road today, I would have balked. I was not mentally, emotionally, or financially prepared for such a step, and if I had taken it, it would have been a complete failure.


It’s not productive to set ourselves up far beyond our means. We should do everything we can every day. Think of it as learning to become a great swimmer. If you sit by the shore making excuses as to why you can’t go in (e.g. the water is too cold, the weather is not good), you will never improve. But, you also can’t jump in and instantly be great at it. You have to wade in, swim as far as you can, and turn back when you are exhausted. The next day, you can swim a little farther.


It’s important to push yourself to succeed, but not so much that you drown. At the same time, if you get too comfortable that you don’t invest some effort, you won’t move forward. To carve out your path to success, do whatever is in your power right now, and let it be enough until the next day.



Those who follow me on social media know that from appearances, I am strong, resilient, and fearless. ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀ And I am. But sometimes, I'm not. The truth is, like any other human being on this planet, no matter how confident I genuinely am most of the time... I still falter. There are days when I feel like shit, don't want to get up, and believe that I am a failure. Like anyone else, I too have days when suffering is all I know. ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀ I just got home from a 9+ month journey and instead of feeling accomplished, I am so utterly exhausted and depleted that I slept a full 18 hours my first night home. ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀ I don't tell you this to be a downer - I want to be honest so that you know that no one's life is perfect, and even the happiest of people can hurt sometimes. Here is what I promise you, though: nothing in life is permanent. Pain, happiness, love, hate... they are all TEMPORARY states of being. Those who are doing it right feel good most of the time and understand that when they don't, it will pass. Everything will pass. ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀ Feelings are what make life meaningful - and we can't always choose which ones pass through us. What we can do - no matter what we’re going through - is choose whether we will come out better on the other side. ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀ ______________________________________________ #visitbrisbane #brisbaneigers #brisbaneanyday #brisbanecity #igersbrisbane #australia_shotz #visitaustralia #australia_oz #amazing_australia #discoveraustralia #exploringaustralia #exploreaustralia #discoverbrisbane #qld #queensland #thisisqueensland #visitqueensland #downunder #travelaustralia #australianlife #sunnylifeaustralia #sheisnotlost #wearetravelgirls #darlingescapes #dametraveler #sheexplores #thetravelwomen #brasileirosporai #blogueirosdeviagens #celinnesoasis

A post shared by Celinne Da Costa (@thenomadsoasis) on Mar 29, 2017 at 1:00pm PDT




Allow Your Definition To Expand


Another revelation I had about success was that its definition changes with time and experience. Initially, my definition of success was making a lot of money at a respectable corporation. I had no interest in working on my own. Once I realized how affordable travel actually was and that being a freelancer granted me freedom over my schedule, I completely changed direction. Who knows, a year from now I may change my mind again and decide that I want to work for another big company.


Our circumstances, mentality, and environment are always evolving – so why shouldn’t our definition of success?


Steve Jobs famously said, “A lot of times, people don’t know what they want until you show it to them.” Though in his case, he was talking about the success of the iPhone, this quote can also apply to our individual search for success.


We have to show ourselves what we want, and we can only do that by continuously pushing ourselves outside of our comfort zone. I didn’t think I was capable of traveling solo so I tried it, first by taking day trips on my own, then increasing the days until I worked up the courage to completely be alone. I didn’t believe I could focus working remotely until I attempted to while I was traveling, and realized I was actually far more productive than in the office. I doubted that my writing could ever be anything more than a hobby until I decided to quit my job and give it a fair shot. Every time I challenged myself to face my doubts and believe in my abilities, my definition of success expanded.


In the end, success is ours to define, achieve, and live up to. Anyone can be successful – it’s just a matter of having the courage to walk your own path, irrespective of others. We don’t know what we are capable of until we give it a try.




-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Southwest Will Stop Overbooking Its Flights Altogether






Southwest Airlines said on Thursday it would stop overbooking its flights, a decision that comes in the wake of a worldwide backlash against larger rival United Airlines for dragging a passenger out of the plane earlier this month.


“Soon, we will no longer book a flight over capacity as part of the selling process,” a Southwest spokesman told Reuters.


Southwest, the No.4 airline by passenger traffic, had the highest forced bumping rate among large U.S. carriers, taking nearly 15,000 passengers off flights last year, or 9.9 per 100,000 passengers, down slightly from 2015.


The carrier paid an average of $874 per bumped passenger, according to Transportation Department data.


In comparison, United was in the middle of the pack in terms of the rate at which it forces people to give up seats. It bumped 4.3 out of every 100,000 passengers, and paid an average of $559 each per bumped passenger.


Chief Executive Gary Kelly told CNBC that the airline would be discontinuing the practice “very shortly”.






“I have made the decision, the company’s made the decision, that we will cease to overbook going forward. We’ve been taking steps over the last several years to prepare ourselves anyway,” Kelly told CNBC.


(Reporting by Arunima Banerjee and Ankit Ajmera in Bengaluru; Editing by Arun Koyyur and Saumyadeb Chakrabarty)

-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

 

Welcome to the Workstudio, the area of Sun on the Rocks Banana Fiction.

Profile Information

Bio
I write Banana fiction, trivial, tropical, and easy to peel. Clocked 1.000.000 words of fiction, 63.000 reads in open salon, all of it sun on the rocks. Ebooks I offer are written by me, I publish as Somers Isle & Loveshade. All characters over 21.
My Website
http://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/SunbeachStudios

 

THE MALIBU CASE.

Or Whether Corporate Nudity should be part of the Dress Code.

THE ACAPULCO COCKTAIL.

Or How a single Drink can turn Thirst into a Traction with the Law.

THE CAYMAN AIR BANNER.

Or Going where your Money goes, to keep an Eye on how it Disappears.

 

THE BAHAMAS LOTION.

Or discerning when the Notion of a Lotion is not Beauty but Dependence.

THE ABU DHABI CHANNEL / THE ADULT CHANNEL.

Or Whether Renting Pleasure is different from Owning it.

THE BAHRAIN BRODERIE / THE OOL BRODERIE.

Or Whether a Wedding can be arranged as a matter of Levity.

THE BELLAGIO WIKILEAK.

Or How to rely on information before the information relies on you. 

THE CUBAN RENEGADE.

Or whether gold can be backed by a Renegade,

when money is backed by the cap of Castro.

THE SUGAR BABY.

Or whether sugar can turn to salt when someone overlooks the honey.

 

Backstories and Characters

CREATED by Somers Isle & Loveshade.

 

If you like Sun on the Rocks episodes and the backstories, please

email which appears on paypal page is correct, ebf[at]telefonica.net.

Workstudio's Blog

The Vanity Ring - 1 - Sun on the Rocks

Posted on April 29, 2017 at 5:00pm 0 Comments

Summary of the amusement

Rejected by socialite Shalia Owell, who has discovered Clarity's false identity as Herbaline employee Darcy Emmers, Clarity becomes agenda and damage control assistant of Elsie Chu, the wife of Singapore billionaire Dao Bin, owner of wireless and telephony company Hunan Enterprises. Disenchanted by a rocky marriage and the lack of…

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Meridian 57 - 15 - Sun on the Rocks

Posted on April 27, 2017 at 5:30pm 0 Comments

Summary of the amusement

After landing at Changi airport in Singapore without a passport, with her friends Lanai and former Herbaline employee Ambi Michaels, teleoperator Clarity Nice is set aside by a woman dressed as a hostess from Singapore Airlines, Yi Ling, before reaching the customs and passport area of the airport. Yi Ling has connections with a…

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Meridian 57 - 14 - Sun on the Rocks

Posted on April 21, 2017 at 1:30am 0 Comments

Summary of the amusement

After landing at Changi airport in Singapore without a passport, with her friends Lanai and former Herbaline employee Ambi Michaels, teleoperator Clarity Nice is set aside by a woman dressed as a hostess from Singapore Airlines, Yi Ling, before reaching the customs and passport area of the airport. Yi Ling has connections with a…

Continue

Meridian 57 - 13 - Sun on the Rocks

Posted on April 14, 2017 at 3:30am 0 Comments

Summary of the amusement

After landing at Changi airport in Singapore without a passport, with her friends Lanai and former Herbaline employee Ambi Michaels, teleoperator Clarity Nice is set aside by a woman dressed as a hostess from Singapore Airlines, Yi Ling, before reaching the customs and passport area of the airport. Yi Ling has connections with a…

Continue

Meridian 57 - 12 - Sun on the Rocks

Posted on April 9, 2017 at 7:00pm 0 Comments

Summary of the amusement

After landing at Changi airport in Singapore without a passport, with her friends Lanai and former Herbaline employee Ambi Michaels, teleoperator Clarity Nice is set aside by a woman dressed as a hostess from Singapore Airlines, Yi Ling, before reaching the customs and passport area of the airport. Yi Ling has connections with a…

Continue

Meridian 57 - 11 - Sun on the Rocks

Posted on March 31, 2017 at 2:00am 1 Comment

Summary of the amusement

After landing at Changi airport in Singapore without a passport, with her friends Lanai and former Herbaline employee Ambi Michaels, teleoperator Clarity Nice is set aside by a woman dressed as a hostess from Singapore Airlines, Yi Ling, before reaching the customs and passport area of the airport. Yi Ling has connections with a…

Continue

Meridian 57 - 10 - Sun on the Rocks

Posted on March 24, 2017 at 2:00am 0 Comments

Summary of the amusement

After landing at Changi airport in Singapore without a passport, with her friends Lanai and former Herbaline employee Ambi Michaels, teleoperator Clarity Nice is set aside by a woman dressed as a hostess from Singapore Airlines, Yi Ling, before reaching the customs and passport area of the airport. Yi Ling has connections with a…

Continue

Meridian 57 - 9 - Sun on the Rocks

Posted on March 19, 2017 at 3:42am 0 Comments

Summary of the amusement

After landing at Changi airport in Singapore without a passport, with her friends Lanai and former Herbaline employee Ambi Michaels, teleoperator Clarity Nice is set aside by a woman dressed as a hostess from Singapore Airlines, Yi Ling, before reaching the customs and passport area of the airport. Yi Ling has connections with a…

Continue

Meridian 57 - 8 - Sun on the Rocks

Posted on March 10, 2017 at 4:00am 0 Comments

Summary of the amusement

After landing at Changi airport in Singapore without a passport, with her friends Lanai and former Herbaline employee Ambi Michaels, teleoperator Clarity Nice is set aside by a woman dressed as a hostess from Singapore Airlines, Yi Ling, before reaching the customs and passport area of the airport. Yi Ling has connections with a…

Continue

Meridian 57 - 7 - Sun on the Rocks

Posted on March 3, 2017 at 1:30am 0 Comments

Summary of the amusement

After landing at Changi airport in Singapore without a passport, with her friends Lanai and former Herbaline employee Ambi Michaels, teleoperator Clarity Nice is set aside by a woman dressed as a hostess from Singapore Airlines, Yi Ling, before reaching the customs and passport area of the airport. Yi Ling has connections with a…

Continue

New Comments

Drew-Silla liked Workstudio's blog post Meridian 57 - 12 - Sun on the Rocks
Apr 10
Drew-Silla commented on Workstudio's blog post Meridian 57 - 11 - Sun on the Rocks
"Maybe it's just me, but I view the Madame Wa character with her bum oil as an allegory for KellyAnne Conway, while Elsie Chu, obviously, is Sean Spicer, although I'm still not sure if Shalia Owell symbolizes Melania Trump or Betsy…"
Mar 31
Drew-Silla liked Workstudio's blog post Meridian 57 - 11 - Sun on the Rocks
Mar 31
Workstudio commented on OS Weekend Fiction Club's blog post Prompts and Stories Lists for February 2017
"ch six, meridian fifty seven."
Feb 24
Workstudio commented on OS Weekend Fiction Club's blog post Prompts and Stories Lists for February 2017
"thank you Alysa, posting Meridian 57, a new amusement."
Feb 6
Workstudio's blog post was featured

Meridian 57 - 3 - Sun on the Rocks

Summary of the amusementAfter landing at Changi airport in Singapore without a passport, with her friends Lanai and former Herbaline employee Ambi Michaels, teleoperator Clarity Nice is set aside by a woman dressed as a hostess from Singapore Airlines, Yi Ling, before reaching the customs and passport area of the airport. Yi Ling has connections with a Secret Society of warrior monks known as the Society of the Enlightened Jade Dragon, and she gets Clarity a passport with diplomatic status and…See More
Feb 5
Workstudio commented on Workstudio's blog post The Emotion Scale - 15 - Sun on the Rocks
"Then, the idea that looking at the positive area of the scale, or of things in general, may lead you to sort of deny or not look, or overlook, your own limitations, shortcomings, or just a space to vent out, whatever work or things you do during the…"
Jan 14
Workstudio commented on Workstudio's blog post The Emotion Scale - 15 - Sun on the Rocks
"General idea of looking at what people out there do a lot today, push on the emotional button of people, to grab attention, get some virality, become popular, etc. Here it's the corporation who does it, to move people to buying what they make…"
Jan 14
Workstudio commented on Workstudio's blog post The Emotion Scale - 15 - Sun on the Rocks
"I liked showing a place like Herbaline, the people working there in the amusement, are so narrow minded, that they will try to lead you to think that black is white, that good is bad, or that you need them, throughout all of your daily stuff, just…"
Jan 14
Workstudio commented on OS Weekend Fiction Club's blog post Prompts and Stories List for December 2016
"ch thirteen, the emotion scale. what happens at Honey ranch, the relational place of Herbaline, the herbal company from orange county."
Dec 30, 2016
Workstudio commented on OS Weekend Fiction Club's blog post Prompts and Stories List for December 2016
"ch twelve, the emotion scale."
Dec 23, 2016
Workstudio commented on Myriad's blog post Snowmageddon, Coldpocalypse...
"my goodness, what a snowfall, no need to build a snowman with the car like that. I lived in Canada a few years, area of Montreal, we got a good three feet the first few winters, along the driveway. Cold for five months is a lot of cold. When I…"
Dec 18, 2016
Workstudio commented on OS Weekend Fiction Club's blog post Prompts and Stories List for December 2016
"chapter eleven, the emotion scale."
Dec 16, 2016
Workstudio commented on Workstudio's blog post The Emotion Scale - 11 - Sun on the Rocks
"this idea of the relational corporation. Is is impossible, or out of reach, today, that one adult person be partner, parent, friend, work mentor or professional sounding board, at the same time? Does the plural relationship outlook make sense then?…"
Dec 16, 2016
Workstudio commented on OS Weekend Fiction Club's blog post Prompts and Stories List for December 2016
"thank you Alysa, happy holidays, posting chapter ten of an amusement, the emotion scale."
Dec 12, 2016
Workstudio commented on Workstudio's blog post The Emotion Scale - 1 - Sun on the Rocks
"this idea of the president without a photo, are companies increasingly like that, places where the head of the company hides or simply does not show up at all, behind a veil of technology and pages on the web, and where it is simply not possible to…"
Dec 2, 2016

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At 7:58am on April 4, 2016, Johnny Robish said…

Thanks Chris!

At 2:45pm on January 26, 2013, Workstudio said…

Welcome to the workstudio, blogsite of Sun on the Rocks in fiction.

 
 
 

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